2021 Ford Edge ST

2021 Ford Edge ST

Test Drive Notes Library
  • Pros

  • Goldilocks size. The Edge is a midsize crossover on the inside, and a smaller than midsize crossover on the outside. Its squared-off styling makes the most of its interior room. So while you get a crossover that’s easy to maneuver and park at the Trader Joe’s Demolition Derby on Saturday morning, there’s room for three in the back seat plus a large haul of Two-Buck Chuck in the cargo compartment. It’s kind of the sensible shoe of crossovers. But wouldn’t we all be better off if we wore sensible shoes?
  • Very competent on road. The Edge has a pretty sophisticated feeling suspension — a more expensive feeling suspension than you’d expect in a $40,000 crossover (which, believe it or not, is the average new car transaction price these days). Handling is very good. It corners well and maneuvers with confidence. At the same time, the good handling doesn’t come at the expense of the ride, which is pretty supple and well-controlled. It feels European. Good job on the suspension, Fordies.
  • Roomy inside. There’s good room up front, which is not unusual. What’s more unusual is making your rear passengers comfortable. There’s room for three in back, with good legroom and very good headroom. The ginormous sunroof makes things feel even more spacious inside. The front windshield and front side windows are large, making it easy to see the road. The Edge also has a low loading floor, so it’s easy to get in and out of — no running boards or winches are necessary.
  • Up to date interior. At the center of the Edge is a large, 12-inch vertically oriented screen. The latest Ford Sync software operates the screen and is largely intuitive. Wireless charging, Apple Car Play, and Android Auto are all included. Otherwise, the interior is somewhat understated. It’s not the most modern or showy interior available, but it does everything it needs to.
  • Quiet. Ford has done a particularly good job of keeping the cabin quiet. Road noise is not an issue. Even with a four-cylinder engine, which can be gravelly when pushed hard, there’s no harassing of your mellow in the Edge.
  • Competent drivetrain. Speaking of the four-cylinder engine, it’s Ford’s corporate 2.0 liter turbo-charged Eco-boost engine. It’s good for 250 hp, which feels like plenty to us. Paired with a smooth 8-speed automatic, the EPA says you can expect 24 mpg, which is not bad. We saw between 22 and 23. If you’re really eager to haul Edge, Ford’s 335 hp twin-turbo 2.7L V6 is an option on the ST trim.
  • Standard safety. The Edge comes with all the required basics now. High speed automatic emergency braking comes as part of a $900 Ford Copilot 360 Assist Plus package.
  • A little extra warranty. While the bumper to bumper coverage is just 3 years/36,000 miles, Ford makes the powertrain warranty 5 years/60,000 miles, which should give buyers a little more assurance.
  • Cons

  • Continent sized A-pillars. OK, we’re talking about a small continent. Like Australia. But still, the A-pillars (the side posts that hold the windshield in place) are really fat. There big enough to block your visibility, particularly when turning. Visibility out back is not very good either, but that’s less crucial than your view of crosswalks when you’re going through an intersection.
  • We’d prefer to have hard controls for heating and cooling. Ford has at least given their “electronic” controls a permanent place at the bottom on the center screen. But that still requires you to look at them, make sure your finger is in the right spot, and then watch to be sure the screen records your input. We give Ford credit for the real volume and tuning knobs, but HVAC could use the same treatment.
  • If you have wireless charging and wireless Apple Car Play, you can hide your phone away in the car, right? No need to see it. Just let it charge while you use its projection on the car’s big screen. The only downside is “out of sight, out of mind,” and ultimately, out of pocket. We left a phone in the tucked-away wireless charging nook when exiting the vehicle several times. BMWs will chime at you with a helpful dashboard message that says, “Don’t forget your phone, dummkopf.” I mean, car makers remind you to check the backseat for your kids. Why not for truly important stuff like your phone?
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