2020 Lincoln Corsair AWD Reserve

2020 Lincoln Corsair AWD Reserve

Test Drive Notes Library
  • Pros

  • Size. If you want the high seating position and utility of an SUV body style, but not the belly-hanging-over-the-belt physical mass of more vehicle than you need, the Corsair might hit the spot. It’s relatively compact, so it’s easy to maneuver, city and highway, and easy to park. Yet it’s certainly big enough to be comfortable and to suit the cargo and passenger needs of most people with fewer than three kids.
  • Looks. Lincoln has done a nice job in recent years. After running with the Town Car look until literally all of their buyers were dead, Lincoln has been searching for a new style. And while the old “More Chrome Trim!” team is still heard from occasionally, a new era of designers seems to have left most of the old garishness behind in favor of good exterior shapes and, if not understated, at least not overstated luxury. All that is to say, you won’t mind being seen in this Lincoln. At all.
  • Ride. Lincoln has done a good job upgrading the Corsair’s Ford Escape underpinnings, adding adaptive suspension, and making for a pretty serene ride. Bumps are absorbed and motions are well controlled. Passengers will be comfortable. Plus, the Escape platform endows the Corsair with very decent handling and road manners.
  • Controls. Nice and clearly laid out. A good example of a well-thought-out interior. The steering wheel even includes volume controls for your fingers, where they naturally rest on the back of the wheel. We love that. Every important piece of information is also projected through the optional head up display, so there’s not much need to glance at the instrument cluster, except out of habit. The clear and bright head up display has not only your speed, but the time, outside temperature, the speed limit, and key safety information. With the exception of the push button gear selector, which has no good reason to exist, we found the controls easy to understand and use.
  • Plenty of power. The 2.3L turbo charged engine produces 295 horsepower, but gave us only 20 mpg overall. That’s the optional engine. The base engine is a 250hp four that the EPA says gets 24 mpg overall. Interestingly, they say the same thing about the 2.3L engine. We would imagine that 250 hp would also be plenty in this car. Both engines come with a smooth, 8-speed automatic.
  • Safety is standard. All the stuff you need comes standard. Hurray for Lincoln. Only adaptive cruise control requires extra dough.
  • Enormous sunroof.
    This is one of the biggest sunroofs we've seen lately. If you like sun, you’ll like the Corsair.
  • Cons

  • Engine noise. While the 2.3L four-cylinder has plenty of power, it does produce a somewhat harsh growl on harder acceleration. Despite their commitment to isolating their owners from the horrors of the outside world, Lincoln hasn’t yet found a way to damp out the four-cylinder engine noise as well as, say, Mercedes or Audi has. And at $59,000 fully loaded (base price around $36K) for the Corsair, they’re playing in the same sandbox.
  • Light steering. This may be exactly what Lincoln drivers want; featherlight, one-finger steering. We prefer a little bit more heft and feel.
  • Adequate rear seats. It’s absolutely acceptable back there, and the rear seats even adjust fore and aft. But it’s not luxurious. If you’re buying a car to frequently carry four adults for hours on end, understand that luxurious rear accommodations are one area in which you’ll be compromising.
  • Only 8-inches? In this era of screen size wars, we’re surprised Lincoln didn’t go with more screen real estate. 8-inches is certainly big enough to do the job, but it seems like every luxury car we get has a larger screen than the last one, making the Corsair’s screen seem small by comparison.
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