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#0939: The Civic Lullaby

Original Air Date: 09.26.2009

   Best Moment

Description: 
This week on Car Talk, Sam in Florida has found the perfect way to get her newborn to stop fidgeting, but worries that she may end up in the Brake Job of the Month Club because of it. Find out her technique, and hear Ray's own kid-quieting strategy. Also, what happens when Tom and Ray's meddling in a marital dispute is, well, disputed? Plus, a college student tries to get the cigarette stink out of his car before his parents visit, and a Suzuki owner fixates on one of the millions of noises his car is making. All this, plus a new puzzler from the Loaves and No Fishes series, and the wisdom of Steven Wright, this week on Car Talk.

Review this Show | 13 Reviews | Need Help Listening? View Call Details

This Week's Puzzler

Vagabonds divide a loaf of bread. How much should each get paid? Find out!

Last Week's Puzzler

Ray shares the answer to "Tommy's trip via biplane and jackass" puzzler. Which choice is the faster? Find out!

Show Open Topic

Tom and Ray share some classic Steven Wright-isms.

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Show Review - 974

by Anonymous

Show Review - 975

by Anonymous

Show Review - 976

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Show Review - 988

by Anonymous

compression test

by Hawke Lubey

today's (9/26/09) 9 AM CDT broadcast advised a caller to purchase a compression tester. An important step in using the tested was omitted in their instructions. "Open the throttle" is critical and often easily forgotten.

Saab 900

by RWKGF

Concerning the '87 Saab 900 (Turbo!) that was capricious about turning over... I had an '80 Saab 900, and I quickly learned that if the oil dipstick was not well-seated, the car would not start, just like this guy's complaint. To my experience, that is a completely unique Saab thing, not that there might not be another half-dozen Swedish fetishes built in to thwart ignition when things were less than perfect. I loved my Saab 900, but it was hard to work on. I figured it was because I didn't know how to swear in Swedish. I've been listening to your show, it seems, all my life; and I am old.

The Best

by Anonymous

I can't always listen but when I do, I get in trouble. Letter to follow. Keep up the good work.

Favorite Moment: Any "Donna" story

I am a product of the civic lullaby

by Anonymous

What a fantastic show! I am 28 years young and when I was an infant my mother would strap me into the car seat in the back of our 1982 Honda Accord sedan and drive me around until the engine lull put me out. She says now that it usually only took about 4 blocks worth of driving before I zonked right out. To this day I still make a lousy passenger/navigator because if I am not behind the wheel, the engine/transmission/road noise in my autos tends to make me very woozy! It drives my wife nuts when we are on a road trip and it's her time to get behind the wheel because she expects me to engage in conversation for hours on end when all I can think about is closing my eyes and taking a nice nap.

I am a product of the civic lullaby

by christopherj.harrison

To this day I still make a lousy passenger/navigator because if I am not behind the wheel, the engine/transmission/road noise in my autos tends to make me very woozy! It drives my wife nuts when we are on a road trip and it's her time to get behind the wheel because she expects me to engage in conversation for hours on end when all I can think about is closing my eyes and taking a nice nap.

... about the foot on the clutch...

by Irek

In Europe, were there is more driven cars with the manual transmission then in US all drivers are taught to do what Kate is doing. As you stop on the red lights you press the clutch (left foot) and the break (right foot), you set the first gear and you wait for the lights to change. This way you stay alert and ready to go without waste of the time for changing the gears and aggravating people behind you. Usually in the manual transmission cars if you abruptly release the clutch with the gear engaged and the foot off the gas pedal the engine stalls and car barely moves, thus there is no chance for catapulting to the intersection. However if you fall asleep in automatic transmission car and you release break pedal then yes you can drive into the intersection. Therefore the argument about falling asleep or into some kind of coma goes against each and every driver in US driving automatic cars. To my surprise no one here changes to neutral on the red lights. Why is that? I think Kate was right and I am not a woman. Other than that I love your show. Irek

Favorite Moment: 2 many

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Great Quotes from Steven Wright

Sent in by listener Alden Adkins.

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